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The Importance Of Teaching Kids to Use Scissors

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Teaching Kids to Use Scissors

Learning to use scissors is a childhood rite of passage. At first it can be be frustrating for both the child and the parent, but did you know that scissor skills are important for things besides cutting paper? Here are five skills that children develop just by learning to use scissors and why Teaching Kids to Use Scissors is extremely important in their Kinder Readiness.

It builds fine motor skills. These are skills we all need for things like brushing our teeth, using utensils, painting, coloring, or even getting dressed. With the opening and closing motion of cutting, it allows children to develop the small muscles in their hands.

Helps develop hand-eye coordination. Hand-eye coordination is developed when you have to use your hands and eyes in unison, which is an important part of cutting. Hand-eye coordination is also necessary for tasks such as catching and throwing a ball, zippering a coat, or eating with a spoon or fork.

It increases bilateral coordination. When children use scissors it requires them to use both the right and left sides of their body at the same time. This is because each hand performs its own task. One had does the actual cutting while the other hand manipulates the paper. This is an essential skill in order to do things like wash dishes, button a shirt, or even opening an envelope.

Helps improve focus and attention. Using scissors takes concentration and attention to detail which will be used in all aspects of your child’s future life and are vital in tasks such as following instructions, doing projects, and possibly playing an instrument.

Helps determine hand dominance. In preschool not all children have determined which is their dominant hand. By using muscles in addition to the ones needed to write with, it helps children determine which hand is more comfortable to write with.

As you are preparing your child to start kindergarten, be sure to encourage them in skills such as writing and reading, but also be sure to encourage them to develop additional skills such as cutting with scissors!

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21 Comments

  • Reply Leigh Kitchens

    A good list of reasons for why it’s important to learn to use scissors. Most kids begin their school years without having this skill, and with cursive & penmanship going the way of the dinosaur parents need to help children develop their fine motor skills.

    April 20, 2017 at 9:57 pm
  • Reply Brandi

    My little girl has been using scissors since she was two. She is very indpendent and likes to do things on her one. I taught her and remind her often of what we can and can not cut and if she forgets, she looses her privelages of having them for a day or two. So far she has done very well with them and uses them a lot while she “teaches” her baby dolls. 🙂

    April 10, 2017 at 10:46 am
  • Reply Sandra Caballero

    I’m excited to teach my daughter how to use the scissors. She will start preschool next fall.

    April 9, 2017 at 4:40 am
  • Reply Heidi Knight

    Both my kids ages 4 and 2 love Cutting projects!

    April 9, 2017 at 12:26 am
  • Reply Laura

    Very interesting! I like that it helps with coordination!

    April 9, 2017 at 12:07 am
  • Reply Kimberly Stoessel

    I was not aware of this. I am going to have to encourage my son to use his scissors a lot more.

    April 8, 2017 at 11:02 pm
  • Reply Gretchen Russick

    I had no idea the use of scissors could be so helpful in encouraging the continued development of fine motor skills! I’ve thought of introducing them to my 2.5 year old while doing crafts together (we have yet to actually do this other than color lol) & allowing him to use the “safer” child’s scissors. I definitely will be allowing supervised use soon!

    April 8, 2017 at 9:42 pm
  • Reply Melissa Broadbent

    Lots of great information!

    April 8, 2017 at 9:31 pm
  • Reply Krystle

    This is a great article, as I’m trying to do this with my 4 year old to learn properly. She loves using scissors!

    April 8, 2017 at 9:13 pm
  • Reply Deborah D

    This has a lot of important information. Some that I never even thought of. Thanks for posting this.

    April 8, 2017 at 11:34 am
  • Reply Ashley R

    It is HUGE for fine motor. I work in a preK and you can easily tell which kids fine motor skills are more developed by their cutting.

    April 8, 2017 at 7:23 am
  • Reply Anel

    I’m still working on this with my LO!

    April 7, 2017 at 8:37 pm
  • Reply Pat F

    Taught preschool for years.. One thing to enforce to the kids .. THUMB UP!

    April 7, 2017 at 1:18 pm
  • Reply Lexy Overstreet Broome

    Thanks for this post. I have been working on coloring and connect the dots with my almost 3 year old and will introduce scissors soon. I hadn’t thought to do so!

    April 7, 2017 at 12:37 pm
  • Reply Pam Williams

    I taught prek for 16 years and I felt this was a top priority! I now teach first grade and see so many who struggle to cut!

    April 7, 2017 at 11:18 am
  • Reply Heather estabrooks

    My son is in 1st grade now and knows how to use scissors, but I didn’t teach him before kindergarten ? woopsy ? I’ll make sure to teach my daughter though, but that’s a bit of a way off since she just turned 1 ?

    April 7, 2017 at 9:55 am
  • Reply Danielle Southern

    It looks like I need to go buy some scissors so my daughter can start practicing.

    April 7, 2017 at 7:45 am
  • Reply Dandi D

    My son started using scissors when he was 3 and he’s a pro at cutting now.

    April 7, 2017 at 7:42 am
  • Reply Patricia DeHoag

    So important! Safety first! Plus it’s. Ice when you’re not doing all the cutting too!

    April 7, 2017 at 12:27 am
  • Reply Michelle S

    I didn’t realize that a task so simple has so many aspects to it. It’s so much more than “don’t run with scissors.”

    April 6, 2017 at 11:11 am
  • Reply Amber Ludwig

    Yes yes yes!! Hand eye coordination and safety when using sharp objects!! Both so important!!

    April 6, 2017 at 9:59 am
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